Showing 5 ideas for tag "overhead costs"

General Services Administration

Relocation of regional offices

Many government agencies have regional offices in some of the most expensive markets in the country. San Francisco, Boston, Manhattan, Seattle, etc. As the leases on these spaces expire, alternative locations should be explored that would reduce rent on the property itself and reduce the cost of living adjustment necessary for employees. Obviously you have to take into consideration the employees affected, but I would... more »

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Legislative Branch

Goverment Access Wi-Fi Hot Spot D.C. Metro Area

Each federal agency spends a high-level of funding resources on IT infrastructure, data warehousing, servers, networking capabilities, and IT security. Costs for IT infrastructure could be significantly reduced if there was a unique, secure, D.C. region-wide, wireless internet hot-spot accessible only by U.S. Government computers. If all U.S. government employee's were "enabled" to access the "hotspot" from any location... more »

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Department of Homeland Security

Use an open floor plan in Federal offices.

Modern offices are minimalist, dynamic, and lively – it is time for the Government to keep pace, and let its employees enjoy the same benefits. Tall cubicle walls are costly and inefficient. Large cubicles with tall dividing walls discourage collaboration, encourage personal distractions, are unwelcoming, and are costly. Several cutting edge private firms, such as Google and Living Social, employ open floor plans in... more »

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Department of Homeland Security

Eliminate Foreign Transaction Charges on Government Credit Cards

When used abroad, the use of a government credit card incurs a foreign transaction fee for a percentage of the cash advance received or the price of an item. Many equivalent cards now waive this fee. The government should adjust its credit card contracts to eliminate foreign transaction fees.

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Department of Homeland Security

Single Sign-On for Government Computer Systems

The proliferation of multiple password standards in the government results in higher overhead costs. When passwords are forgotten, IT support must step in to reset them, resulting in lost productivity on the part of the user and the use of additional support resources. Use of a single sign on function for all government systems would keep support costs lower by limiting the number of password reset requests, while increasing... more »

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