Showing 22 ideas for tag "per diem"

Legislative Branch

Cut travel per diem

Federal per diem has become an entitlement for staying at over-priced hotels and eating out all the time. There are usually much cheaper options for places to stay that aren't being used, and since people are expected to feed themselves anyway, the restaurant-scale meals and incidentals are too high as well. If federal executives want to travel with the business crowd, they can pay out of pocket for it.

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Equal Employment Opportunity Commission

Use travel money saved by this idea on other things

When traveling, if an employee has a friend or relative in the area where they are visiting, allow the employee to stay with the friend or relative and save on the hotel room & per diem. The agency then can use the money saved for other things (my office constantly runs out of postage the last week of September, for example).

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Department of Homeland Security

Reduce Lodging Expenses when on TDY

When someone travels to a city where they know someone, have them be able to stay with that person and receive a portion of what would have been spent on the hotel, perhaps 50%. That money could be used to thank the person whose house you are staying at, etc. So, for example, if someone was traveling to Los Angeles the current allowable per diem is 123. If the employee chooses not to stay at a hotel, allow them to... more »

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Legislative Branch

Reimburse Actual Travel Costs Only

Many agencies are still reimbursing a full Per Diem Rate plus M&IE. At other agencies, when an employee saves money by choosing less expensive lodging, the savings is split with the employee as incentive.

Stop this. All travel costs should be paid for with a travel card. M&IE should only pay actual expenses. Public transportation should be used first, unless cost savings of rental cars can be shown/justified/pre-approved.... more »

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National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Per diem

The Federal government per diem rates are higher than necessary. For instance, in Punta Arenas, the rate for 2010 was $99 when a fairly large meal would cost ~$20. Even with incidental costs, the $99 figure is excessive, and this trend seems to be true for every place I have traveled. Reducing the per diem paid to everyone who travels while working for the government could greatly reduce government expenditures.

In addition,... more »

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General Services Administration

Hotel Per Diem Rates

Require that approved hotels provide government employees on official travel with room rates that are at the per-diem rate for that area. Currently, some hotels only allocate a certain number of rooms at the government rate; once these are booked up, government either has to cover the additional expense, or employees have to search for alternate lodging. A case in point occurred this past month, when an area with a $116... more »

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Department of Defense

Eliminate Per Diem Allowance for Meals and Incidental Expenses

Most DoD travelers are making profits by pocketing the difference between their Meal and Incidental Expenses (MIE) per diem and actual costs. Eliminating the MIE per diem and reimbursing travelers for only actual expenses (up to a limit) would not only save costs during travel, but would also reduce travel overall by disincentivizing people from taking unnecessary trips just to make a profit from their MIE per diems.... more »

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Department of Defense

Travel savings (TDY) - Hotel Per Diem

There is currently no incentive for an employee to stay at less expensive hotels. I propose that if an employee books a hotel that is less than the maximum allowable per diem, then the employee and the government share the savings. For example, if maximum Per Diem for San Diego is $150 a night, and the employee books a $60/night hotel, the employee is paid half of the difference ($45), and the government saves $45.

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Department of the Treasury

Hotel Per Diem Incentive to Traveler

Encourage employees to choose the lowest hotel rate below the Per Diem by giving them 10% of the amount below the Per Diem. Example, if the Per Diem is $200 and the final hotel bill is $100, the traveler would receive 10% of the amount below the Per Diem - $10.

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Department of Defense

Per Diem only for meeting location

Do not allow for a traveler to select a per diem location 'near' the meeting location when that selected location pays a higher per diem than the meeting location. Often travellers will select a nearby town for their hotel simply because the per diem is higher. This should be explicitly dis-allowed.

And the time spent by the traveller complaining they don't get to choose where they want to stay should be on their own... more »

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Department of Defense

Modifying Travel Per Diem Entitlements

There is an average amount (or more appropriately, percentage of the maximum) employees spend on travel expenses. This amount is almost certainly extremely close to the maximum allowed (or 100%), and certainly not the minimum possible. Employees should be compensated for spending less than this average amount, for instance, 50% of the savings. As an example, if I spend $60/night at a hotel instead of the average $90/night... more »

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Department of Defense

Reduce Excessive Travel M&IE

As a federal employee, whenever I travel on official business, I am granted compensation for my meals and incidental expenses (M&IE) at a rate usually set by GSA, but also set by DoD or DoS in some jurisdictions. If I do not spend up to the compensation rate, I pocket any excess (untaxed I might add). At least this is how it works in DoD.

I have rarely ever spent up to the M&IE rates, despite generally eating well.... more »

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Department of Defense

Modernizing DAU Online Course Delivery

I have never been a fan of online courses, particularly ones where a student simply clicks through a set of slides. However, online course delivery has evolved into a format that is not only cheaper, but one which can actually provide a higher-quality learning experience than a traditional classroom.

Universities around the world are now providing virtual classrooms for their students. I encourage you to view MIT’s free... more »

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