Showing 7 ideas for tag "e-mail"

Department of Health and Human Services

Increasing productivity by limiting distracting blast e-mails

Our workdays are frequently interrupted by "blast" emails intended for broad audiences. These emails serve as random interruptions that break up the rhythm of our work-tasks, and reduce our attention span and productivity. There are many peer-reviewed scientific journal articles supporting the negative effects of random distractions on attention and productivity, including reductions of our energy and efficiency. This... more »

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Department of Homeland Security

Voluntary Use of Personal Cell/Smart Phone to Reduce Gov Costs

In one hand is my personal smart phone. I love it. I pay for unlimited voice and data with this phone. I can surf freely and without guilt that I'm wasting government money when I do so. It's also faster and more flexible than...what I hold in my other hand, my blackberry. I hate it. I only use it for government business which is largely viewing e-mails when I'm off site. So I carry two of these devices around.... more »

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Department of Defense

E-Readbooks for Senior Officials

At nearly every military command or defense agency I have worked for, every night watch floors and staffs set to the task of printing hundreds of pages of documents for executive readbooks. Most senior officials only have time to review a fraction of the documents, which are subsequently shredded. This wastes reams of paper and thousands of dollars in labor costs. These documents are already posted online and are readily... more »

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Department of Homeland Security

Excessive e-mails

There is an e-mail message that is sent to all in our Port, which really should only be going to CBP Officers affected by the overtime call-out list. The message comes 1 to 3x a day. It is an annoyance to me and others who are non-uniform personnel. The message has no relevance to us. We already receive a burdensome amount of mind-boggling e-mails. This not only wastes our time, even if we delete them, but it is annoying... more »

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Department of Agriculture

voluntary use of personal cell phones for e-mail

Many scientists travel frequently for field research and meetings, and it is useful to be able to access our e-mail on our cell phones. Currently, the e-mail system is set up so that it is only possible to access e-mail on your government laptop or on a government blackberry. It is wasteful to spend money to buy everyone a government blackberry, and many of us would prefer to use our personal cell phone to access our... more »

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Department of Homeland Security

Faxes to Email

To save paper and allow us to work most efficiently, we could install software that would permit faxes to be sent directly to our e-mails. Foremost, this would facilitate the President's telework initiative as it would permit the receipt of faxes through e-mail. This software would also save us from printing faxes into hard copy and allow us to have electronic versions of the documents that would permit us to store... more »

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Department of Health and Human Services

Too Much Information Not Enough Communication

As government employees we receive hordes of information via e-mail from our own agencies that do not pertain to each and every member of the agency. I propose that we cut out extraneous information that is sent to everyone in a certain or specific email directory/organization. If the correspondence is for information only, at least allow us the opportunity to ‘unsubscribe’ from some of these directories. All important... more »

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