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Department of Defense

Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactor (LFTR) and Green Electricity

Because of its inherent safety features, non-proliferating and super-efficient green technology, it is proposed to install underground, small-scale Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactors (LFTR) in all U.S. Navy installations around the world to provide electric power at a cost less than that from coal power plants. Some of the many advantages of the LFTR system over other nuclear reactor designs are presented. It is the unique combination of the thorium cycle and the liquid fluoride salts that promise safe, cheap, efficient, and emissions-free energy. Long-term savings would be in the billions of dollars, dependent upon how many U.S. Naval installations around the world use this technology.

Imagine a nuclear reactor that is inherently safe. Imagine a nuclear reactor that has NO possibility of a meltdown. Imagine a nuclear reactor that produces NO weapons-grade plutonium to make an atomic bomb. Imagine a nuclear reactor that could consume all of those spent nuclear fuel rods stored in today’s nuclear power plants, as well as all those old nuclear weapon stockpiles, while producing electricity in the process. Imagine a nuclear reactor that would produce less than 1% of the long-lived and highly toxic radioactive waste of today’s nuclear power plants and would reduce waste storage issues to only about 300 years (compared to 10,000 years or more for those spent fuel rods). Imagine if this nuclear reactor did not need to operate at high pressure, which would, in turn, eliminate any chance of expelling radioactive substances into the atmosphere (as occurred in both Three Mile Island and Fukushima nuclear catastrophes). And finally, imagine a nuclear reactor whose lifecycle costs would be half of what a present-day nuclear reactor of equal power output would be. The United States actually built and successfully ran one for over four years! This was done approximately fifty years ago at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee. I have much more info on how to fund project.

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Idea No. 13782