Department of Commerce

Thermostat +3 summertime, -3 in winter

I'm tired of having to wear long sleeve shirts in July and short sleeve shirts in January.

 

It doesn't need to be 70 in the summer, which is exactly what my cubicle thermometer says right now. 72-74 would be fine.

 

And keep it a bit cooler in the winter as well. Shoot for 68-70, not 74-76 ... which is what i was seeing last winter.

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Executive Office of the President

Moderate use of air conditioning and heating

In a city as hot and humid as Washington, DC, the difference between what is comfortable to wear outside, and what is comfortable to wear inside, can be drastic. Having the air conditioning turned up so high in the building that I need to keep a sweater in my desk and take afternoon walks outside to warm up is a waste of energy, as well as being uncomfortable. Install adjustable thermostats in buildings - even the old ...more »

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Department of State

Energy conservation at the office

The lights and air conditioning are always left on at the end of the day, ostensibly for "security reasons," so that security guards can turn it all of at the end of the day. If lighting were motion activated and air conditioning were also tied to lighting, then we would stop wasting light and cool air on areas without people.

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Department of Health and Human Services

Brrr...it's cold in here!

In the last week, DC has had day after day of record high temperatures, with the heat index soaring past 100 on a daily basis. Heat warnings, sweaty metro rides, and sweltering walks have abounded as thousands of government employees have gone to work during these hottest of days. Inside the halls of the HHS Aerospace Building, however, the temperature has been something much more akin to arctic. As I walk through the ...more »

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Legislative Branch

Limit Air Conditioning: Always TOO cold/TOO hot

If you are sitting in a government facility right now, you probably know what I am talking about. Already having talked with many (public) elem., jr. high, high school, (and even college) students, I observed that most complained how they have to bring a jacket during summer and that they are steamed in the classrooms during winter and so it is very confusing to choose what to wear. Additionally, the people working in ...more »

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Department of Energy

No Suits and Ties in the Summer

Federal government buildings are kept incredibly cool in the summer - one could even say the temperature inside Federal buildings is downright cold in June, July, and August! Constituents and citizens entering the buildings wearing typical summer-wear are quickly shivering. The Federal government uses an enormous amount of power to keep government buildings so cold in the summer. High power usage costs the government ...more »

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Department of State

Limit Air Conditioning

HST is freezing, even in the middle of summer. For some time, I've been thinking about buying a space heater for the office, which would waste even MORE engergy and tax payer money. Turn down the air conditioning, even a few degrees, and save big.

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Department of Housing and Urban Development

Limiting Air Conditioning

I do not know how it is for other offices or agencies, but the Air Conditioning at HUD is overused and a waste. The Temperature is set to a degree, where employees are bringing in their own personal heaters, creating an even bigger wastage. Air conditioning should be at a comfortable level during the Summers, and heat should be limited during the Winters. Employees are just sitting around at their desk most of the time, ...more »

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Department of Energy

Energy Savings

I suggest that we paint all roofs white to save energy. This is a simple solution and would have a dramatic impact on the cost of air conditioning. This would not require any studies to be made as many have already been done on this which could be referenced. It would only require labor and paint. Additionally, if DHS purchased all of the white paint from one source and used a single contractor for the labor, that ...more »

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National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Revolving Exterior Doors

Replace exterior doors with revolving doors to prevent outside air from entering the building. This would save on heating in the winter and cooling in the summer. The current automatic doors remain open long after the user passes through. With the door wide open, air conditioning (or heat) escapes the building. A revolving door would prevent large amounts of interior conditioned air to escape, thus saving on utilities. ...more »

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Executive Office of the President

dress code appropriate for the weather/temperature

A majority of the energy cost in my home is due to heating in the winter and cooling in the summer. I would assume that a massive amount of federal money goes to heating and cooling office space. Current dress codes and customs suggest that a person should dress exactly the same in both winter and summer. This requires more heating/cooling costs for buildings as they try to reach 70 degrees for every work day. Instead, ...more »

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General Services Administration

Summer Business Casual Dress Code = Less A/C

Why are federal employees expected to wear suits and ties during summer? The summer dress code for all federal workers should be changed to business casual [including golf shirts] and the ambient indoor temperature of federal office buildings should be increased 5 degrees. Employees will be more comfortable at work and commuting on mass transit, no more complaints about overly air conditioned offices, and the government ...more »

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