Department of Defense

Put Solar on All Government Roofs when built or repaired

Roofing Projects for new government buildings and for Repairing existing government buildings is expensive, but it would Save a lot of money over time if we added Solar Panels at the same time as roof work is being contracted. The installation costs would be reduced greatly and the electrical savings would more than make up for the smaller construction cost over time and would lower our dependence on energy. It would... more »

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Executive Office of the President

No Up-Front Cost Energy Saving

Set up financing so that the investments in energy-saving equipment and other energy efficiency upgrades can be done without any initial cost. With a financing mechanism in place, a project that might cost $10 million up front and save $1.5 million per year, could now be done with no up-front cost. The $10 million would be borrowed and, if paid back over 15 years, it would cost less than $80,000 per year. So, rather... more »

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Department of Defense

Navy Energy Efficiency Managers

Lack of a comprehensive unit-level energy education program inhibits a collective application of improved practices and does not encourage innovation from the deck plates on up to work towards newer cost-cutting efficiencies in an increasingly challenging fiscal environment. Including reportable progress metrics with recognition and rewards for the best quarterly efforts will further incentivize a more robust collateral... more »

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Department of Agriculture

Smart procurement of Government vehicles

My idea can be enacted by the President in an hour. Have the entire Executive Branch streamline the procurement of Federal vehicles by limiting them to sedan models with a four cilinder engine only and light trucks limited to six cilinder engines only. Currently all American car manufacturers build fuel efficient vehicles with these features, even full size, 4x4 light trucks. Limiting procurement of vehicles to these... more »

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Department of Veterans Affairs

Power-saving policies

In order to conserve electricity (and therefore operating costs), as many items as possible should be powered down when not in use. Office lights should have timers/motion sensors installed that turn them off after a certain period of inactivity. Printers can be powered down at the end of the day (or when they are not in use - sometimes I use my printer only a few times a week). Scanners should remain powered off and... more »

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Department of Homeland Security

Alternating - Light Bulbs (Turn off every other bulb).

We may be using Fluorescent light bulbs, but we should continue to alternate bulb use like we did prior to using Fluorescent light bulbs. We should keep some lights bulbs Off while others light bulbs are On (alternating bulbs). Thus still providing enough lighting to do the job while conserving Electricity; Reducing lighting where necessary.

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Department of the Interior

Change Building Temperatures

Require warmer facility temperatures in summer and cooler facility temperatures in winter. Encourage people to dress appropriately for the season. Most facilities could change their temperatures a degree or two with little difference in occupant comfort. Over the entire federal government a huge cost savings can be recognized. Unoccupied spaces can be adjusted more significantly.

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Department of the Interior

Turn off computer monitors at night.

Turn off computer monitors at night. Computer monitors can always be turned off at night. Computer upgrades can occur with monitor screens switched off. Leaving computer monitors on at all times is a huge waste of energy and dollars. It is completely unneccessary!! Let's save those dollars! Let's save that energy! It will also cut our greenhouse gas emissions!

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